Case studies in social work research

Introduction Participant observation, for many years, has been a hallmark of both anthropological and sociological studies. In recent years, the field of education has seen an increase in the number of qualitative studies that include participant observation as a way to collect information. Qualitative methods of data collection, such as interviewing, observation, and document analysis, have been included under the umbrella term of "ethnographic methods" in recent years. The purpose of this paper is to discuss observation, particularly participant observation, as a tool for collecting data in qualitative research studies.

Case studies in social work research

June 22, Social Media and the Workplace New platforms can be tools for connection with colleagues and outside experts, but can also serve as distractions while on the job By Cliff Lampe and Nicole B.

Ellison Social media influences and permeates many aspects of daily life for Americans today, and the workforce is no exception.

Case studies in social work research

These digital platforms offer the potential to enhance worker productivity by fostering connections with colleagues and resources around the globe. At the same time, employers might worry that employees are using these tools for non-work purposes while on the job or engaging in speech in public venues that might reflect poorly on their organization.

A Pew Research Center survey of 2, American adults including who are currently employed on a full- or part-time basis conducted Sept. Some of these activities are explicitly professional or job-related, while others are more personal in nature.

The survey asked Americans who are employed full- or part-time about eight different ways they might use social media while on the job and found that: Younger workers are more likely than their older counterparts to say they have discovered information about a colleague on social media that lowered their professional opinion of them — but also are more likely than older workers to have found information that improved their professional opinion of a colleague.

Many employers have rules for how employees use social media at work Many workers report that their employers have policies about social media use on the job, or about how employees may present themselves in various online spaces.

Policies that regulate how employers present themselves online outside of work may be expected to influence whether these workers use social media at all. However, this does not seem to be the case: At the same time, there is some evidence that workplace policies concerning social media use while on the job may have an effect.

Workers whose companies have policies regulating social media use at work are less likely to use social media in certain ways: On the other hand, workers are equally likely to say they use social media for a range of purposes regardless of their workplace policy, including: Making or supporting professional contacts that help them do their job Learning more about someone they work with Building or strengthening personal relationships with coworkers Asking work-related questions of people outside their organization Asking work-related questions of people inside their organization Relatively few workers use specific social media platforms for work-related purposes, and the impact of that use is not always clear-cut A relatively modest share of workers say they have incorporated specific social media platforms into their day-to-day work lives: But among the group that answered yes to at least one of the items above — that is, the subset of workers who use at least one social media tool for job-related purposes — large shares see certain positive or beneficial impacts on their job performance: On the other hand, these workers are divided on the utility of social media in other respects, especially when it comes to the impact of social media use on their own job performance: Social media users are defined as workers who said they use one of the five major social media sites studied here, see the topline for the full list.Practising Social Work Research: Case Studies for Learning - Kindle edition by Rick Csiernik, Rachel Birnbaum, Barbara Decker Pierce.

Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Use features like bookmarks, note taking and highlighting while reading Practising Social Work Research: Case Studies for Learning. As part of the Desert Research and Training Studies (D-RATS), NASA/JPL performs annual field tests on the ATHLETE robot in conjunction with robots from other NASA centers.

Unstructured Interviewing

Volume 6, No. 2, Art. 43 – May Participant Observation as a Data Collection Method. Barbara B.

Social Work Services in Nursing Homes: Toward Quality Psychosocial Care

Kawulich. Abstract: Observation, particularly participant observation, has been used in a variety of disciplines as a tool for collecting data about people, processes, and cultures in qualitative vetconnexx.com paper provides a look at various definitions of participant observation, the.

In the social sciences and life sciences, a case study is a research method involving an up-close, in-depth, and detailed examination of a subject of study (the case), as well as its related contextual conditions..

Case studies can be produced by following a formal research method. These case studies are likely to appear in formal research venues, as journals and professional conferences. Do you know all the best times to post on social media?

Case studies in social work research

In this post, we've crunched the data from 16 studies to find the best times for each network. Workers turn to social media for a range of reasons while at work, with taking a mental break and connecting with friends and family being among the most common.

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