Effective academic writing 1 answer key download

Space exploration is much too expensive and the money should be spent on more important things. What is your opinion? IELTS Writing Task 2 Model Answer There is an argument that exploring space is a waste of money and that there are more urgent needs to be addressed on earth, such as reducing poverty and preventing environmental destruction. However, I completely disagree with this opinion for two reasons.

Effective academic writing 1 answer key download

At the same time the discourse community does not expect to see any writing that appears too foreign. For this reason the academic writer must follow the constraints see article section below set by the discourse community so his or her ideas earn approval and respect. They define what is an acceptable argument.

Each discourse community expects to see a writer construct his or her argument using their conventional style of language and vocabulary, and they expect a writer to use the established intertext within the discourse community as the building blocks for his or her argument.

Writing for a discourse community[ edit ] In order for a writer to become familiar with some of the constraints of the discourse community they are writing for, a useful tool for the academic writer is to analyze prior work from the discourse community.

Across most discourses communities, writers will: For example, the way a claim is made in a high school paper would look very different from the way a claim is made in a college composition class.

Porter Contrary to some beliefs, this is by no means plagiarism. Writers should also be aware of other ways in which the discourse community shapes their writing.

The following sections elaborate on these functions. The article states that "A fact derived from the Latin factum, see below is something that has really occurred or is actually the case". But this is not how writers think of facts. Writing professionals hold that, "In a rhetorical argument, a fact is a claim that an audience will accept as being true without requiring proof".

The audience can be thought of as a discourse community, and a fact can suddenly change to become an opinion if stated in a different discourse community.

This is how writers within discourse communities manage to present new ideas to their communities. Therefore, knowing the intended discourse community is a very important part of writing. Across discourse communities, what is considered factual may fluctuate across each community.

You, like most people, would probably classify the statement "the Earth is round" as a "fact. Misconceptions regarding making a novel argument[ edit ] Within discourse communities, writers build on top of the ideas established by previous writers.

But this is simply not the case. Discourse communities introduce new ideas and claims, and from these, writers expand on them. James Porter, a scholar of Rhetoric at Indiana University, uses The Declaration of Independence as an example to illustrate this point.

Porter points out that Jefferson merely pulled the phrase "That all men are created equal" straight from his commonplace book he made as a boy. Jefferson wrote this great work by weaving together the intertext of his discourse community.

As Greene describes in his article, "Argument as Conversation", academic writing can be thought of metaphorically as a conversation between those in the discourse community. Just like in a conversation when you listen to the ideas of the others who are involved and formulate your own opinion on the topic, a writer may be reading a paper done by another writer in the discourse community and from this paper, the scholar may obtain inspiration to expand the claims expressed in the paper or address them from other angles.

Good academic writers know the importance of researching previous work from within the discourse community and using this work to build their own claims. By taking these ideas and expanding upon them or applying them in a new way, a writer is able to make their novel argument. Intertextuality[ edit ] Intertextuality is the combining of past writings into original, new pieces of text.

effective academic writing 1 answer key download

The term intertextuality was coined in by Julia Kristeva.The Online Writing Lab (OWL) at Purdue University houses writing resources and instructional material, and we provide these as a free service of the Writing Lab at Purdue. From March , some IELTS test takers for UK Visas and Immigration will be able to take their IELTS test on computer.

A limited number of places will be available at the British Council for IELTS for UKVI (Academic) delivered on . Effective Academic Writing 2e Intro Student Book [Alice Savage] on vetconnexx.com *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers. Effective Academic Writing, Second Edition provides the tools necessary for successful academic writing: Step-by step Writing Process guides and refines writing skills.

-Timed Writing practice prepares students .

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Answer Key Of Effective Academic Writing 3 Answer key booklet contents academiaedu, effective academic writing 3: answer key 15 part 3: developing your ideas exercise 5 (p ) a 2 e 4 b 6 d exercise 1 (p.

ADVANCED WRITING. IN ENGLISH AS A FOREIGN LANGUAGE A Corpus-Based Study of Processes and Products Horvath Jozsef Lingua Franca Csoport ADVANCED WRITING IN ENGLISH.

Prevent Plagiarism. Identify unoriginal content with the world’s most effective plagiarism detection solution. Manage potential academic misconduct by highlighting similarities to the world’s largest collection of internet, academic, and student paper content.

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